Death By Exercise

Dave Goldberg falling off a treadmill and dying on a gym floor is the kind of news that makes you question a lot of things about life.

I’ve been in shock since I first heard the story on the news. The last few months, I’ve amped up my exercise routine, I started swimming lessons, I sometimes do intense workouts at the gym and when I am done, and have accomplished something I wasn’t sure I could do, I often scream with excitement, “I did it and I didn’t die!”

It’s what I shouted as I fist pumped the air when I came out of the pool after my first swim class. “I didn’t die!”

It’s what I muttered as I limped away from my first spin class, legs feeling like overcooked noodles and my private parts feeling like they had been assaulted by the tough bike seat. “That was rough, but thank God I didn’t die!”

A couple years ago when I did my first 40 mile bike tour and felt myself fading as I crossed what felt like the endless Verrazano bridge into Staten Island, and to the finish line, my happiest thought when I collapsed on the grass in the park was “I made it and I didn’t die.”

I’ve said some version of that statement many times but totally in jest. I don’t really think about dying when I’m exercising.

But then Dave Goldberg, on vacation, goes to a gym, falls off a treadmill, cracks his skull open and dies right there in the gym. That’s real. And extremely sad.

A couple years ago, a teenager collapsed and died after crossing the finish line at her first half marathon. Later, her parents said they were happy that her last act was one of accomplishment. 

Does it make it harder to cope with a loss knowing that a person has died doing something that we’ve all been told is necessary, and which was probably not fun? Most runners might tell you they don’t really love the treadmill. What was Mr. Goldberg thinking in his final moments? We exercise to make ourselves healthier. No one expects that it will be to their detriment.

This story sucks on so many levels. Dave Goldberg was a great innovator and probably a real nice guy in his personal life, and now he’s gone. Death by exercise. The saddest story in the world.

Source: NY Times

Life is precious. Enjoy every moment! Treat yourself to all the deliciously wonderful moments you know you deserve. 

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14 Comments Add yours

  1. Scott Danzig says:

    I did enjoy my long treadmill sessions when I still had a treadmill. I’d flip on a movie and go at it. But I preferred relying on incline, rather than speed, because I stumble once in a while. It’s scary to hear about this happening. And yes, it also sheds light on just how fleeting life can be. Death treats us all the same once we’re within its grip.

    Like

    1. Run Wright says:

      Thanks for your comment, Scott. I do some treadmill running myself, especially when it’s too hot or too cold outside.

      Like

  2. Darlene says:

    Carpe Diem. I hate the treadmill. Now I know why.

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    1. Run Wright says:

      To be fair, there have been several exercise-related tragedies in different environments, like when an Ironman contestant drowned in the open water swim in NY – but this treadmill accident just seems really disappointing.

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  3. I was shocked when I first heard the story because I have legit fears about falling off the treadmill and that just confirms those fears. I’ll run on one if I have no other choice, but I can always feel my gait being thrown off as I try to be super careful not to slip and break myself. I know it’s not a common thing, but still… makes you think.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      My treadmill fear is often that my shoelace will become untied and I’ll get sucked into the machine (I have a hyperactive imagination)

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  4. This was really sad news and a great loss. Something we all do or have done could happen to us, I have yet to read if possibly he had vertigo that would have caused him to fall.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      We really have to treasure each moment. I’m praying for his family, especially those young children.

      Like

  5. This is so sad.
    I never go on the treadmill, but it’s because I find it boring (more than scary). I also have said “I didn’t die” a LOT of times after a workout. Now I just won’t.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      The treadmill can indeed be really boring. At the gym, i position myself so I can watch something on tv and try to do intervals or vary the speed and incline to keep things interesting.
      Thanks for commenting

      Like

  6. Julia says:

    Oh man, this is so sad! I don’t like the treadmill, partially because I feel out of control on it and it makes me feel unsure of my footing. Praying for his family.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Yes. Famous or not, whatever the case, someone lost a father, husband, brother, son. I’m praying for them too.

      Like

  7. This was terrible news, but should be more of a wake up call to the safety necessary to perform exercise correctly. As a degreed and certified fitness professional, I preach constantly about the need for exercising in a safe environment and with a partner. Also, you need to consider using the safety clip on machines like treadmills. If he had been on one in a fitness facility instead of a hotel fitness closet, he might have received much needed medical attention. Be aware of your surroundings; get qualified information on how to workout; and do so with a partner! A senseless loss in my book.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      I totally understand. It’s a real tragedy to fall and go unnoticed and without help until it’s too late. I have never heard of a safety clip but I would like to find out.

      Like

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