3 Frogs On A Log

I had a conversation with one of my mentors yesterday. Among the things he shared was this question:

3 frogs are sitting on a log, one decides to jump off, how many frogs are left sitting on the log?  Think about it before you scroll for the answer. I am adding a couple of pics just so you’ll have time to think about the answer.

   
Are you ready for the answer?

So 3 frogs are sitting on a log, one decides to jump off, how many frogs are left sitting on the log?  Well, 3 of course. Why? Because deciding to do something isn’t the same as doing it. The world is full of good intentions. Losers have good intentions. People who can’t get a diet started have good intentions. People who sign up for a gym have good intentions. People who buy running clothes have good intentions. People who sign up for races have good intentions. People who make a to-do list have good intentions. People who open up the laptop and start thinking about a novel outline have good intentions. But that’s just deciding to jump off the log.
At some point, you have to make the leap to transform your good intentions into good actions. You have to actually start the diet, go the gym and get on the treadmill, put some miles on the fancy running shoes to break them in, you have to show up at the start line and run the race, do the things on the list, tap away at the keyboard consistently for a few months and write the 70,000 word minimum it takes to finish a novel.

Deciding to jump isn’t the same as jumping. 

I’ve had a lot of good intentions. People I planned to call or visit, things I planned to do, miles I planned to run, weight I planned to lose, books I planned to finish and publish so I could see my name on the display at the bookstore. But it won’t matter if I never do them.

The road to failure is paved with good intentions. We have to move from good intentions to good actions.

I’m currently reading John C. Maxwell’s Intentional Living: Choosing a Life That Matters Click the link to purchase a copy on Amazon.

Thanks for reading my blog and now I am going to go cross some things off my To-Do List. Won’t you join me? 

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21 Comments Add yours

  1. maryintheboondocks says:

    It’s funny that you should bring it up because that is a word I use frequently when I am writing my posts. Of course, most of my posts are how-to’s so I would be in big trouble if I just thought about it and never completed the projects. But now that you have got me thinking about it, I’ll have to be a little more careful of it’s use.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Thanks for the comment, Mary. I think most of us could stand to be a little more intentional in at least one aspect of our lives.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent, excellent point! Actions speak louder that words. Set your intentions and then go after them!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Nicole, there are a lot of people with a whole lot of good intentions. I know. I’ve been one of them. I’m working on actions today though. Thanks for the support

      Like

  3. Great post! There are intentions and then there’s actually taking the leap. It’s so important to stop saying you’re going to do something and just do it!

    Like

    1. Run Wright says:

      I hope this post will encourage even one more person to jump off the log and do something they’ve been planning to do for a long time so thanks for the validation Janelle.

      Like

  4. Ah interesting points! Intentions are not the same as actions are they?!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      No they aren’t. I’ve discovered that the hard way too.

      Like

  5. Love this! I am all about doing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Yes you are! You usually have some great accomplishments to share. Keep doing!

      Like

  6. I needed this blog today! Thank you. Thinking about it isn’t the same thing as doing something.
    http://headfullofbooks.blogspot.com/2015/10/bookish-and-not-so-bookish-thoughts.html

    Like

  7. So convicting and so true! Glad you wrote this post, I needed it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Great. Thank you so much for saying that! I needed it too and I’m glad I’m not alone.

      Like

  8. Kate W says:

    Great post. I used to work in a gym and part of my job was to call members who’d paid for their membership but hadn’t actually been to to the gym “Paying for the membership doesn’t get results!”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Haha. I didn’t know gyms did that. I must have missed those calls because months passed when I didn’t go to my gym once. 😕
      Thanks for reading, Kate

      Like

  9. Haha the brainteaser completely got me!! I hear you 100% on the intentions. There’s actually a cartoon I love about the people who are all about ‘positive thinking’ and going to lectures on getting stuff done, versus the people who are actually putting in the work and breaking their backs in the process. Scoured the internet but to no avail!

    For me, it’s about finding the ‘intentions’ that work for me- I know personally that parting with cash (a gym membership, new workout clothes, a race entry) will DEFINITELY make me get that shit done- I hate wasting money! Also telling literally everyone that I’m gonna do something (like get up early and run, or take up swimming) really works for me too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Thanks for sharing, Pippa and you’re right that we need to find the motivation that works for us as individuals. Accountability is a big motivator for me – if someone is expecting me to do something, it’s harder to blow it off than if I just promised myself.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Patrice says:

    OUCH! Step on my toes why don’t you!

    Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Haha. Yours and mine. Let’s do something about it.

      Like

  11. Megan says:

    I’m usually good at those little riddle, but this one got me haha.

    These points are so true for a lot of us. We know why we should be doing something, but we just don’t do it.

    Have you come across the theory that talking about your goals (and getting external praise) can sometimes give the same positive feedback as actually completing the goal? Like talking about how you’re going to get back into the gym, someone will praise you for it, give you the warm and fuzzies like you get when you do complete an awesome workout, and then, you don’t feel the same desire to actually get to the gym.

    I’m not sure about this 100% of the time, and I still believe it’s great to talk about your goals, I just thought it was interesting when I heard that point of view 🙂
    Loving your posts! Will be back.
    Meg x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Run Wright says:

      Thanks so much for your visit and thoughtful comment, Meg. I don’t think I’ve heard this before but I believe that the praise we get from someone about goal setting could quench the desire to do the actual goal, if what we seek is
      Praise instead of accomplishment.
      Deep down, praise might just be our motivation anyway. We wanted the praise from doing the act but if we can get it from just talking about it, that’s even better.
      I suppose that’s why we have to be motivated by more than just what other people think or say. We have to decide to do things for ourselves.
      Great point. Thanks so much for adding it here.

      Like

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