Reading Women 2020

One of the reading challenges I am doing this year is this one organized by the ladies who run the Reading Women podcast. The Reading Women  challenge is designed to motivate readers to consciously choose more works by women authors and about subjects that are empowering to women.  As I read books that meet these prompts, I will come back to update this post and highlight the challenges to mark my progress.

All books read for this challenge must be by or about women.

(Please note that the spirit of this challenge is to read books that aren’t by men.)

  1. A Book by an Author from the Caribbean or India

  2. A Book Translated from an Asian Language

    • Bonus if the translator is a woman!

  3. A Book about the Environment

    • There are so many great books out there about environmentalism and our environment. Have a look on our Goodreads group for some stellar recommendations.

  4. A Picture Book Written/Illustrated by a BIPOC Author Sulwe /Lupita Nyong’o

  5. A Winner of the Stella Prize or the Women’s Prize for Fiction (on my shelves currently, I have How to be both /Ali Smith, 2015; Half of a Yellow Sun /Chimamanda Adichie, 2007; Bel Canto /Ann Patchett , 2002)

  6. A Nonfiction Title by a Woman Historian

  7. A Book Featuring Afrofuturism or Africanfuturism

    • Africanfuturism is defined by Nnedi Okorafor on her website.

    • Afrofuturism is often defined as “a way of imagining possible futures through a black cultural lens” (Ingrid LaFleur).

      • You can find out more about Afrofuturism in Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-fi and Fantasy Culture by Ytasha L. Womack.

      • Examples include N.K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth Trilogy, Escaping Exodus by Nicky Drayden, Dread Nation by Justina Ireland, Mind of My Mind by Octavia Butler, Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora edited by Sheree Thomas, My Soul to Keep by Tananarive Due, Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord, and Black from the Future edited by Stephanie Andrea Allen and Lauren Cherelle.

      • We’ll be discussing Afrofuturism in as our theme for February (2020), so stay tuned!

  8. An Anthology by Multiple Authors

    • Your choice for this prompt can be any type of literature—short stories, essays, poetry, plays, etc.— as long as it’s written by a group of different authors.

    • All of the authors do not have to be women.

    • Bonus points if the editor is a woman.

  9. A Book Inspired by Folklore

    • Any country or culture’s folklore works!

  10. A Book about a Woman Artist

    • For this prompt, we are focusing on women visual artists, like sculptors, painters, potters, etc.

  11. Read and Watch a Book-to-Movie Adaptation

    • A Television Show or Mini-series is fine too.

    • If you typically use audio description tracks with movies/film, but can’t find one for the book-to-film adaption you’re looking for, listening to a radio drama adaption will count for this challenge.

  12. A Book about a Woman Who Inspires You – Olive, Again /Elizabeth Strout 

  13. A Book by an Arab Woman

  14. A Book Set in Japan or by a Japanese Author

  15. A Biography

    • A biography is an account of someone’s life written by someone else. This isn’t to be confused with autobiography or memoir.

    • Bonus points if the biography is written by AND about a woman. 🙂

  16. A Book Featuring a Woman with a Disability

    • This includes any kind of disability, whether from mental illness, learning disabilities, or physical conditions.

  17. A Book Over 500 Pages

  18. A Book Under 100 Pages

  19. A Book That’s Frequently Recommended to You

  20. A Feel-Good or Happy Book

  21. A Book about Food

    • Both cookbooks and food writing work for this challenge.

  22. A Book by Either a Favorite or a New-to-You Publisher

  23. A Book by an LGBTQ+ Author

  24. A Book from the 2019 Reading Women Award Shortlists or Honorable Mentions

BONUS

  • A Book by Toni Morrison (Reading The Bluest Eye this month)

  • A Book by Isabel Allende

What do you think? I'd love to hear your thoughts as well.

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